New Blog: OH-pinions

As many of you know I’ve started a new company called Bevology, Inc. As part of the process, I’ve also begun a new blog titled OH-pinions. (https://steveraye.wordpress.com/ )

So please mosey on over to the new site and let’s keep the conversation flowing.

Capture

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U.S. Wine Market: Disrupting the System. Presentation at Vinitaly 2015

I’m just back from a loooooooong trip to Europe which ended in Verona at Vinitaly 2015 giving a presentation on disruptive strategies for the U.S. market.

The basic premise is that the web has democratized wine marketing permitting smaller players to compete on an even playing field with the big guys with big budgets.

Change the equation: 1+1=11

Change the equation: 1 +1 = 11

I talk about several strategies suppliers can use to connect directly with consumers at the precise moment in time they’re looking for information on specific wines, producers, varieties, regions and countries.

You can access the presentation here: US Wine Market, Disrupting the System. Steve Raye Vinitaly 2015 or on SlideShare.

And a special thanks to Stevie Kim of Veronafiere and her crack team for the invitation and hosting.

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Cultural Tips on Doing Business in the American Wine Market

I’m just back from two weeks in Spain educating wineries in DO Ribera del Duero and Rueda on the U.S.  Market.  One of the subjects most requested by the attendees was for insights on dealing with Americans from a cultural perspective.  Here’s what I presented.   (Spanish version posted under the English.)
CULTURAL TIPS FOR DOING BUSINESS IN AMERICAFuhgeddaboutit

What Defines Americans?
• Individualism, self-reliance and the drive to be successful.
• Anything is possible if you work hard enough.
• Getting things accomplished-and accomplished on time-is the primary goal, developing interpersonal relations as a way to get there is secondary.
• The future is more important than the present.
• Don’t like to waste time, always in a hurry, think time is money: time is kept, filled, saved, used, spent, lost, gained, planned, given and even killed.
• Competition…we love it! It brings out the best in any individual and system.
• We do everything fast: Patience is a waste of time. (quote from Victor Imbimbo)
• There is a difference between confidence and cockiness…what you’ve done matters, not what you say you’re going to do.
• Education, income, awards, popularity are highly valued and rewarded.
• We like to eat fast, not linger as you do in Europe…more often than not, the goal is to eat more than socialize.
• We value facts over theory, and especially when combined with knowledge, experience, passion, commitment in others.
• We appreciate persistence. It may take 10 or 15 attempts to get a response. Don’t take it personally.
• Change is good, new/innovative is prized. Old has a different meaning to Americans. If it’s old it’s probably not good.
• Generally ignorant of other countries and languages.
• We realize Americans are perceived by others as:
• Pushy, abrupt, inconsiderate and loud….and that describes the average American in a small city or town.
• In NY we consider these as art forms.

Work Ethic
• Success is the highest value in American life… The American Dream: Money, status, possessions, fame, respect.
• Action is seen as the key to success. To not be busy can be considered lazy.
• We like to say “rules are meant to be broken,” but we never say “laws are meant to be broken.”
• “It’s amazing how successful I am when I am well prepared.”

Interpersonal Behavior
• Punctuality is expected: 15 minutes early is on time, on time is late, late is unacceptable.
• Keep your distance/physical space…1-1.5 meters.
• Don’t ask someone’s age, income, or weight.
• Politeness: “Please,” “Thank you” and “You are welcome” for everything. It’s rude not to respond to “Thank you.”
• Don’t smoke. If you must, ask permission first, and don’t be surprised to hear “No.”
• Don’t be insulted if someone calls you by your given name if they find your surname too hard to pronounce. And unless it’s “Smith or Jones” it’s too hard to pronounce.

Political Correctness
• Don’t talk about race, gender or sexual orientation.
• Don’t touch, especially between males.
• Americans say “pardon me” or “excuse me” if they touch someone by accident, get too close, or if they do not understand what someone has said.
• Kissing: Air kiss someone as a greeting only if you know someone or they initiate it.
• Hand shaking: Make sure to have a firm grip, 1-2 shakes. Once you know someone, if you really want to communicate deep personal connection and sincerity hold their elbow with your left hand as you shake. Do not do this the first time you meet someone.
• When introducing colleagues, give a little info… “This is John Jones. He designed the sell sheet I just gave you.” Or “He looks after our business in Scandinavia.”
• Tipping: Restaurants/Bars: 20% minimum. Doormen $1 for a cab, $1-$2/bag for bellman, hair/nails 15%,. Cabs 15%, you’re expected to sit in the back—and remember to fasten your seat belt.
• The person who extended the invitation is expected to pay for the meal.
• RSVP means you must respond. Even if nobody else does, you will gain respect if you do.
• Do not worry about hurting someone’s feelings by responding “No” to an invitation. But people will be offended if you say “Yes” and then don’t attend.
• Times for events are important. If it’s 6-8PM, leave very close to the ending time stated.

Business Meetings
• Americans will assume you understand something if you do not tell them otherwise.
• Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you do not understand things…we ask a lot of questions and expect you to as well.
• If we’re speaking too fast, it’s ok to interrupt and ask us speak more slowly please.
• Agendas are critical, stick to them.
• The U.S. is a phone-driven culture, and now with the prevalence of smartphones, even more than ever. “Phone” extends to email, texting, What’s App, Skype.
• Handlon’s Razor: “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by ignorance.
• Exchanging business cards is casual, expect yours will be accepted, not looked at, and just put in a pocket.
• “Yes” means yes. “No” means no. And “maybe” really means maybe…more information or time needed.
• Get it in writing. A verbal agreement has little value. A confirming email is a bare minimum to any agreement.
• Hire a lawyer when you’re making important agreements, and make sure it’s someone with experience in the wine industry.
• Americans commonly begin negotiations with unacceptable conditions or demands….recognize this is just a starting position from which they then have room to negotiate.
• Pace of negotiations is usually fast.
• Emails should get answered in no more than 24 hours, keep it short, specific, clear. Include your contact info on your signature line with your personal email address, not info@.
• NEVER WRITE EMAILS IN ALL CAPITALS .

A Few Wine Industry Cultural Things:
• Don’t be intimidated and absolutely don’t be unprepared…unless you want to be intimidated.
• Big companies=hubris. They deliver mass, momentum, safety. Small companies=innovation, creativity, nimbleness, risk.
• Talk in our terms: 9L cases not bottles. Degrees Fahrenheit, not Celsius.
• Understand the jargon: DA, bailment, POS, below the line, etc.
• Recognize your objectives aren’t your importer’s…”why don’t they just sell?” Answer, because they’re making more money with other brands.
• When you visit accounts, introduce yourself to the manager as soon as you walk in…you’re in their home.
• Come prepared.
o Have all your materials available in print as well as in emailable form or on a thumb drive (and don’t expect to the thumb drive back.)
o Be ready with the answers to the questions you expect and expected the unexpected.
o You can expect what you inspect.
Tips:
• Show that you’re listening by asking, “Can I take notes.” Let them see you do it…it’s flattering.
• “So, help me understand”
• “What I’m hearing you say is.”
• Deadlines and commitments are REALLY important…meet them.
• Do NOT get involved in pricing conversations on work-withs or with retailers. It’s their job, and in some states it’s illegal.
• Your brand is more important than the wine. Having great wine is necessary but not sufficient. You need to have Point of Difference that Makes a Difference….have a story.
• We eat lunch between 12-2 and dinner 6:30-8:30.
• We tend toward informality in dress and interactions. Do not mistake it for impoliteness or lack of seriousness.
• Don’t mistake kindness for weakness.
• Lack of deference to age and authority is not disrespect, it’s rooted in the American tradition of equality.
• Try not to be insulted by our directness, we think it’s a virtue.
• To signal the end of a conversation, we say: “Well, I don’t want to take up any more of your time.”
• Small talk is important as a prelude to any conversation. It’s important to show interest in the person and their life before getting to the point. But get to the point.
o Good subjects for small talk: weather, traffic, movies, music, hobbies, food, restaurants, sports and work
o English is rich with polite conditional verb forms…would, could, can, may, might
• “How are you” is not a real question, just a phrase. Respond with: “Fine, great.”
• When Americans say “We’ll have to get together” or “Let’s do lunch” or “See you later” it’s not an invitation to or commitment to a next meeting, it’s just a friendly gesture. If no date is specified, it’s just a pleasantry.
• We don’t like silence. However that said, it can be a GREAT negotiating tool. Generally though, try to participate in the conversation, even if your English isn’t great…silence can also connote unpreparedness or not having anything important to contribute.
• Meetings usually end with a summary with action plans and assignments by person. Follow-up is mandatory.
• There are many people in any given business meeting who can say “No”, but only one person who can say “Yes.” When negotiating, make sure you know who that person is, and determine if they are in the room or not.
© 23 Feb 2015
Steve Raye

CONSEJOS CULTURALES PARA HACER NEGOCIOS EN AMÉRICA

Qué caracteriza a un Americano?

• Todo es posible si trabajas todo lo necesario.
• La meta es lograr nuestros objetivos a tiempo; desarrollar relaciones interpersonales es secundario.
• El futuro es más importante que el presente.
• No nos gusta perder el tiempo, siempre con prisas, pensamos que el tiempo es dinero: conservamos, archivamos, guardamos, usamos, gastamos, desperdiciamos, perdemos, ganamos, planeamos, damos e incluso matamos el tiempo.
• Individualismo, autosuficiencia, contar con uno mismo y motivación para el éxito.
• Competición… ¡nos encanta! Pone de manifiesto lo mejor de cada individuo y del sistema.
• Lo hacemos todo rápido: la paciencia es una pérdida de tiempo.
• Una motivación para lograr el éxito apasionada y que a menudo lo abarca todo.
• Hay una diferencia entre confianza y chulería… ‘lo que has hecho’ es lo que importa, no ‘lo que dices que vas a hacer’.
• Educación, ingresos, premios, popularidad son altamente valorados y recompensados.
• Nos gusta comer rápido, no tomarnos nuestro tiempo, como hacéis en Europa… el objetivo es comer, no socializar.
• Valoramos los hechos más que la teoría, y especialmente si están combinados con conocimientos, experiencia, pasión, compromiso con los demás.
• Apreciamos la persistencia. A veces hay que intentarlo 10 ó 15 veces antes de obtener una respuesta.
• El cambio es bueno; lo nuevo/innovador es altamente apreciado. Si es viejo, probablemente no es bueno.
• “Viejo” significa algo totalmente diferente en América.
• Tenemos una dentadura fantástica.
• Generalmente no sabemos nada de otros países ni de otras lenguas.
• Sabemos que a los americanos los demás nos ven como:
o Agresivos, bruscos, inconsiderados y ruidosos… y eso en una ciudad pequeña o en un pueblo.
o En Nueva York esto es un arte… “forget about it” (¡olvídate!)

Ética de Trabajo

• Lo que más se valora en América es el éxito… el Sueño Americano. Dinero, estatus, posesiones, fama, respeto.
• Acción es la clave para el éxito. No estar ocupado se podría considerar estar haciendo el vago.
• Nos gusta decir “las reglas están hechas para romperlas”, pero nunca decimos “las leyes están hechas para romperlas”
• “Es increíble el éxito que tengo cuando estoy bien preparado”

Comportamiento Interpersonal

• Se espera que seas puntual: llegar 15 minutos antes es considerado llegar a tiempo, llegar a tiempo es llegar tarde, llegar tarde es inaceptable.
• Mantén la distancia/espacio físico…entre 1 y 1,5 metros.
• No le preguntes a nadie su edad, lo que gana o su peso.
• Educación: por favor, gracias y de nada para todo. Es de mala educación no responder a “Gracias”
• No fumes.
• No te sientas insultado si alguien te llama por tu nombre si no pueden pronunciar tu apellido. Y, si no es “Smith” o “Jones” no lo podrán pronunciar.
• Los hechos son más importantes que la teoría.

Ser Políticamente Correcto

• No se puede hablar de raza, sexos, orientación sexual.
• No tocarse, especialmente entre hombres.
• Los americanos dicen “lo siento” o “perdón” si tocan a alguien sin querer, si están demasiado cerca o si no comprenden lo que alguien ha dicho.
• Besar: da un beso al aire para saludar (rozar las mejillas) sólo si conoces a la persona o si ellos lo hacen primero.
• Para dar la mano hazlo con firmeza, dos a tres apretones de manos. Sujeta el codo de la otra persona con tu mano izquierda para comunicar gran sinceridad y la existencia de una conexión personal.
• Cuando introduzcas a tus colegas ofrece algo de información sobre ellos… “Éste es John Jones. Fue él el que desarrolló el folleto que te acabo de dar”. O “Él es el encargado de nuestro negocio en Escandinavia”.
• Propinas: restaurantes/bares: 20% mínimo. Porteros $1 por un taxi, $1-$2 por cada bolsa para el botones. Taxis 15%, uno se sienta en los asientos de atrás… y que no se te olvide ponerte el cinturón.
• La persona que invita es la que paga la comida.
• RSVP significa que tienes que responder. Incluso si nadie más lo hace, ganarás el respeto de la persona que te invitó si lo haces.
• No te preocupes por herir los sentimientos de alguien si respondes “no” a una invitación. Sin embargo, la persona se sentirá herida si dices “sí” y no apareces.
• Las horas de los eventos son muy importantes. Si vas a uno de 6-8 vete cerca del final del periodo de tiempo indicado.

Reuniones de Negocios

• Los americanos asumen que entiendes si no les dices que no lo entiendes.
• No tengas miedo de preguntar si no entiendes algo… Nosotros hacemos muchas preguntas y esperamos que tú hagas lo mismo.
• Si hablamos demasiado rápido está bien interrumpir y pedirnos que hablemos más despacio.
• La orden del día es de gran importancia y hay que atenerse a ella.
• Los Estados Unidos es una cultura centrada en el teléfono, y ahora con los smartphones (móviles inteligentes), más que nunca. Con “teléfono” queremos decir email, texting, “What´s App”, Skype.
• Lograr la meta que quieres alcanzar es la principal motivación para un Americano. Establecer una relación con alguien como parte del proceso, es secundario.
• La Cuchilla de Handlon: “Nunca atribuyas a malicia lo que se explica fácilmente como resultado de la ignorancia”
• Intercambiar tarjetas de negocios es casual. Aceptarán la tarjeta, no la mirarán y la guardarán.
• “Sí” significa sí. “No” significa no. Y “quizás” realmente significa quizás… se necesita más información o tiempo.
• Ponlo por escrito. Los acuerdos verbales no valen nada.
• Contrata a un abogado cuando hagas acuerdos importantes. Si necesitas referencias, envíame un email a sraye@comcast.net
• Los americanos normalmente empiezan sus negociaciones con condiciones o demandas que son inaceptables… esto es una posición desde la que pueden empezar a negociar.
• El ritmo de las negociaciones es normalmente rápido.
• Los emails normalmente se responden en menos de 24 horas. Mantenlos cortos, específicos, claros. Incluye tu información de contacto en la línea de tu firma, con tu dirección personal de email, no info@
• NUNCA ESCRIBAS TUS EMAILS EN MAYÚSCULAS.

Unas Cuantos Detalles Culturales de la Industria del Vino:

• No te sientas intimidado y definitivamente no estés poco preparado… a no ser que quieras sentirte intimidado.
• Grandes compañías = orgullo. Ofrecen volumen, inercia , seguridad. Pequeñas compañías = innovación, creatividad, destreza, riesgo.
• Habla en nuestros mismos términos: 9L cajas, no botellas.
• Comprende la jerga: DA, depósito, POS, below the line, frontline Price, SPA, shipments, depletions, , etc.
• Reconoce que tus objetivos no son los mismos del importador… “¿por qué no se dedican simplemente a vender mi vino?” Respuesta: “porque ganan más dinero con otras marcas”
• Cuando visites cuentas preséntate al manager nada más entrar… estás en su casa.
• Ven preparado.
o Ten todos los materiales impresos y un flash drive o que se puedan enviar por email. Y no esperes que te devuelva el flash drive.
o Ve preparado con las respuestas a las preguntas que esperas, y espera lo inesperado.
o . Lo que se espera que sea revisado no se llevara a cabo

Consejos:

• Demuestra que estás escuchando y pregunta “¿Puedo tomar notas?”. Que vean que lo haces… es muy halagador.
• “A ver, ayúdeme a comprender esto”.
• “Lo que yo entiendo es”
• Los plazos y los compromisos son MUY importantes… cúmplelos.
• NO te metas en conversaciones sobre precios cuando estes visitando clientes minoristas. Es trabajo del distribuidor, y en algunos estados es ilegal.
• El que tengan muy buen vino es requisito necesario pero no es suficiente. Debes de tener un Punto de Diferencia (ofrecer algo diferente) que Marque la Diferencia (que cambie la situación).
• La comida es entre las 12 y las 2 y la cena entre las 6:30 y las 8:30.
• Tendemos a la informalidad en la vestimenta y en las interacciones. No confundir esto con falta de educación o falta de seriedad.
• No confundir amabilidad con debilidad.
• La falta de deferencia a la edad y la autoridad no es falta de respeto; está arraigado en la tradición americana de igualdad.
• No te sientas insultado por nuestra franqueza, para nosotros es una virtud.
• Para indicar que hemos terminado una conversación decimos: “Well, I don`t want to take up any more of your time” (Bien, no quiero abusar de tu tiempo).
• Las conversaciones superficiales son importantes como preludio de cualquier conversación. Es importante mostrar interés en la persona y su vida antes de meterse en la cuestión. Pero ve al grano.
o Buenos temas de los que hablar: el tiempo, el tráfico, películas, música, hobbies, comida, restaurantes, deportes y trabajo.
o El inglés tiene una gran riqueza de formas condicionales de verbos respetuosas… “would”, “could”, “can”, “may”, “might” (sería, podría, puedo, debo, debería)
• “¿Cómo estás?” no es realmente una pregunta, sólo una frase. Responde con: “Bien, gracias”.
• Cuando los americanos dicen “Tenemos que juntarnos un día” o “Tenemos que comer juntos” o “Hasta más tarde” no es una invitación o compromiso para juntarse de nuevo, es sólo una frase amistosa. Si no se indica una fecha es sólo una amabilidad.
• No nos gusta el silencio. Pero es un instrumento GENIAL para negociar. Participa, incluso si tu inglés no es muy bueno… el silencio tiene la connotación de que no estás preparado o de que no tienes nada importante que aportar.
• Las reuniones normalmente terminan con un resumen con planes de acción y asignaciones para cada persona. Es obligatorio cumplirlas.
• En todas las reuniones de negocios hay mucha gente que puede decir “no”, pero sólo una que puede decir “sí”. Cuando estés negociando asegúrate de que sabes quien es esa persona, y si está presente o no.
© 23 de febrero del 2015
Steve Raye

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Cultural Tips for Doing Business in America

I’ll be giving a series of seminars in Spain next week and one of the presentations is on cultural tips for doing business in America.

 

What Defines Americans?
• Individualism, self-reliance and the drive to be successful.
• Anything is possible if you work hard enough.
• Getting things accomplished and on time is the primary goal, developing interpersonal relations as a way to get there is secondary.
• The future is more important than the present.
• Don’t like to waste time, always in a hurry, think time is money: time is kept, filled, saved, used, spent, wasted, lost, gained, planned, given and even killed.
• Competition…we love it! It brings out the best in any individual and system.
• We do everything fast: Patience is a waste of time.
• There is a difference between confidence and cockiness…what you’ve done matters, not what you say you’re going to do.
• Education, income, awards, popularity are highly valued and rewarded.
• We like to eat fast, not linger as you do in Europe…the goal is to eat, not socialize.
• Value facts over theory, and especially when combined with knowledge, experience, passion, commitment in others.
• We appreciate persistence. It may take 10 or 15 attempts to get a response. Don’t take it personally.
• Change is good, new/innovative is prized. Old has a different meaning to Americans. If it’s old it’s probably not good.
• Have great teeth
• Generally ignorant of other countries and languages.
• We realize Americans are perceived by others as:Fuhgeddaboutit

• Pushy, abrupt, inconsiderate and    loud….and that describes the average American in a small city or town.
• In NY we consider these as art forms

Work Ethic
• Success is the highest value in American life… The American Dream: Money, status, possessions, fame, respect.
• Action is seen as the key to success. To not be busy can be considered lazy.
• We like to say “rules are meant to be broken,” but we never say “laws are meant to be broken.”
• “It’s amazing how successful I am when I am well prepared.”

Interpersonal Behavior
• Punctuality is expected: 15 minutes early is on time, on time is late, late is unacceptable.
• Keep your distance/physical space…1-1.5 meters.
• Don’t ask someone’s age, income, or weight.
• Politeness: Please, thank you and you’re welcome for everything. It’s rude not to respond to “Thank you.”
• Don’t smoke. If you must, ask permission first, and don’t be surprised to hear “No.”
• Don’t be insulted if someone calls you by your given name if they find your surname too hard to pronounce. And unless it’s “Smith or Jones” it’s too hard to pronounce.

Political Correctness
• Don’t talk about race, gender or sexual orientation.
• Don’t touch, especially between males.
• Americans say “pardon me” or “excuse me” if they touch someone by accident, get too close, or if they do not understand what someone has said.
• Kissing: air kiss as a greeting only if you know someone or they initiate it. (And we tend to be a little bit confused as to how many…1 in South America, 2 in Europe, 3 in Russia?)
• Hand shaking: Make sure to have affirm grip, 1-2 shakes. If you really want to communicate deep personal connection and sincerity,hold their elbow with your left hand as you shake. Do not do this the first time you meet someone.
• When introducing colleagues, give a little info…”This is John Jones. He designed the sell sheet I just gave you.” Or “He looks after our business in Scandinavia.”
• Tipping: Restaurants/Bars: 20% minimum. Doormen $1-$ for getting you a cab, $1-$2/bag for bellman. Cabs 15%, we sit in the back—and remember to fasten your seat belt!
• The person who extended the invitation is expected to pay for the meal.  The convention most of us adopt is we pay when you are guests in our country, you pay when we’re guests in yours.
• RSVP means you must respond. Even if nobody else does, you will gain respect if you do.
• Do not worry about hurting someone’s feelings by responding “No” to an invitation. But people will be offended if you say yes and then don’t attend.
• Times for events are important. If it’s 6-8PM, leave very close to the ending time stated.

Business Meetings
• Americans will assume you understand something if you do not tell them otherwise. (I’ve made THAT mistake a number of times.)
• Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you do not understand things…we ask a lot of questions and expect you to as well.
• If we’re speaking too fast, it’s ok to interrupt and ask us to speak more slowly please.
• Agendas are critical, stick to them.
• The U.S. is a phone-driven culture, and now with the prevalence of smartphones, even more than ever. “Phone” extends to email, texting, What’s App, Skype.
• Handlon’s Razor: “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by ignorance”
• Exchanging business cards is casual, expect yours will be accepted, not looked at, and just put in a pocket.
• “Yes” means yes. “No” means no. And “maybe” really means maybe…more information or time needed.
• Get it in writing. A verbal agreement has little value. A confirming email is a bare minimum to any agreement..
• Hire a lawyer when you’re making important agreements. (need referrals, email me sraye@comcast.net)
• Americans commonly begin negotiations with unacceptable conditions or demands….recognize this is just a starting position from which they have room to negotiate.
• Pace of negotiations is usually fast.
• Emails should get answered in no more than 24 hours, keep it short, specific, clear. Include your contact info on your signature line with your personal email address, not info@.
• NEVER WRITE EMAILS IN ALL CAPITALS.  IT READS LIKE YOU ARE SHOUTING

A Few Wine Industry Cultural Things:
• Don’t be intimidated and absolutely don’t be unprepared…unless you want to be intimidated.
• Big companies=hubris. They deliver mass, momentum, safety. Small companies=innovation, creativity, nimbleness, risk-taking
• Talk in our terms: 9L cases not bottles. Degrees Fahrenheit, not Celsius.
• Understand the jargon: DA, bailment, POS, below the line, etc.
• Recognize your objectives aren’t your importer’s…”why don’t they just sell?” Answer, because they’re making more money with other brands.
• When you visit accounts, introduce yourself to the manager as soon as you walk in…you’re in their home.
• Come prepared.

o Have all your materials available in print as well as in emailable form or on a thumb drive (and don’t expect to get the thumb drive back.)
o Be ready with the answers to the questions you expect and expected the unexpected.
o You can expect what you inspect.

Tips:
• Show that you’re listening by asking, “Can I take notes.” Let them see you do it…it’s flattering.
• “So, help me understand”
• “What I’m hearing you say is.”
• Deadlines and commitments are REALLY important…meet them.
• Do NOT get involved in pricing conversations on work-withs or with retailers. It’s their job, and in some states it’s illegal.
• Your brand is more important than the wine. Having great wine is necessary but not sufficient. You need to have Point of Difference that Makes a Difference.
• We eat lunch between 12-2 and dinner 6:30-8:30.
• We tend toward informality in dress and interactions. Do not mistake it for impoliteness or lack of seriousness.
• Don’t mistake kindness for weakness.
• Lack of deference to age and authority is not disrespect, it’s rooted in the American tradition of equality.
• Try not to be insulted by our directness, we think it’s a virtue.
• To signal the end of a conversation, we say: “Well, I don’t want to take up any more of your time.”
• Small talk is important as a prelude to any conversation. It’s important to show interest in the person and their life before getting to the point. But get to the point.

o Good subjects for small talk: weather, traffic, movies, music, hobbies, food, restaurants, sports and work
o English is rich with polite conditional verb forms…would, could, can, may, might

• “How are you” is not a real question, just a phrase. Respond with: “fine, great.”
• When Americans say “We’ll have to get together” or “Let’s do lunch” or “See you later” it’s not an invitation to or commitment to a next meeting, it’s just a friendly gesture. If no date is specified, it’s just a pleasantry.
• We don’t like silence. But it’s a GREAT negotiating tool. Participate, even if your English isn’t great…silence connotes unpreparedness or not having anything important to contribute.
• Meetings usually end with a summary with action plans and assignments by person. Follow up is mandatory.
• There are many people in any given business meeting who can say “no”, but only one person who can say “Yes.” When negotiating, make sure you know who that person is, and determine if they are in the room or not.

 

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Hey, here’s an idea, let’s NOT do a Grand Tasting: Vinitaly Visionary, Stevie Kim

She’s about 5’ 2” tall and about 95 pounds soaking wet, but Stevie Kim’s impact is belied by her physical stature. She is the driving force behind the recent success and growth of Vinitaly. (And, oh by the way, in her spare time she’s also managing Vinitaly’s wine pavilion at the upcoming Expo Milano 2015 in May.)

Dr. Ian D'Agata and Stevie Kim

Dr. Ian D’Agata and Stevie Kim

As part of Vinitaly’s outreach to the global wine community Stevie has conceived a number of innovative initiatives including Opera Wine, Wine Hackathon, Vinitaly International Academy (VIA) as well as Vinitaly on the Road, the New York event stop being one at which I’ve had the pleasure of speaking.
While New York dodged a bullet on Tues from the second annual Storm of the Century, Jan. 27 also is notable in something else that didn’t happen—a walk around grand tasting.

For the first time in my experience an international wine event in New York was planned to meet the needs of the market in which it was to take place, as opposed to the mistaken belief in grand tastings by trade marketing consorzia (aka “Generics”) and EU funding authorities.
Instead the VIA planned an event titled “A Study of Sangiovese,” a Focus Level Seminar. Because of the snow event it has been postponed till Jun 2. The session will be led by Dr. Ian D’Agata who is the author of “Native Wine Grapes of Italy.” The seminar will explain and illustrate the tapestry of terroir and the impact of aging expressed by 15 spectacular wines of vintages from 1974-2001.

The bad news was that the event had sold out for its initially scheduled date, but I’m hoping for an invite for the June 2 rain date. Some of the fabulous wines to be exhibited include the Chianti Classico Riserva Rancia by Felsina in three historic vintages, and the 1974 Montesodi Chianti Rufina by Frescobaldi.

Lucky for the Toronto wine geeks, the seminar was held there after being aborted in NY, another first for Vinitaly Canada and homecoming for Dr. D’Agata who’s Canadian born and bred.

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2015 Wine and Spirit Competitions, Events and Trade Shows

Here’s a compilation of the major industry competitions, events and trade shows coming up for 2015 posted in roughly chronological order.

COMPETITIONS

Ultimate Spirits Challenge
Accepts brands not currently imported to the US
www.ultimate-beverage-challenge.com

Ultimate Wine Challenge
Accepts brands not currently imported to the US
www.ultimate-beverage-challenge.com

BTI (Beverage Testing Institute)
Accepts brands not currently registered in the U.S.
Deadlines throughout the year for wine, spirits and beer competitions
http://www.tastings.com/trade.html

IWSC (International Wine and Spirits Competition)
Multiple competitions and deadlines by region
http://www.iwsc.net/home

International Spirits Challenge
Put on by Drinks International Magazine. Entry deadlines vary by category.
http://www.internationalspiritschallenge.com/

San Francisco World Spirits Competition

http://www.sfspiritscomp.com

San Francisco Wine Competition
2015 date TBD, Entries usually due Mar 1
Deadline May 22, 2015.  Accepts products not currently registered in the U.S.
http://www.sfwinecomp.com/

Berlin International Wine Competition
Mar 1-2, 2015
Berlin, Germany
http://berlininternationalspiritscompetition.com/

Spirits of the Americas
Florida, entry deadline Mar. 31, 2015
http://www.spiritsoftheamericas.com/home

New York International Wine Competition
May 17-18, 2015 (Deadline for entries May 12)
www.nyiwinecompetition.com

Melbourne International Wine Competition
June 28-29, 2015, Melbourne, Australia
http://melbourneinternationalwinecompetition.com/

New York World Spirits and Wine Competition
Sept. 10-11, 2014
http://www.nyworldwineandspiritscompetition.com

New York International Spirits Competition
Oct. 18-19, 2015
www.nyispiritscompetition.com

Indie Spirits Competition
2015 TBD, usually Chicago in Sept.
http://indiespiritsexpo.com/

American Wine Society Commercial Wine Competition
Oct 2015
http://www.americanwinesociety.org/?

SIP Awards (Spirits International Prestige)
2015 deadline TBD, usually March.
www.sipawards.com

Grand Harvest Awards
(Terroir-based competition by Vineyard and Winery Management)
2015 Grand Harvest Awards Deadline: November 13, 2015
Judging: November 17-18, 2015
http://www.winecompetitions.com/#nav=grand-harvest

Los Angeles International Spirits Expo Competition
2015 dates TBD
http://laspiritsexpo.nationbuilder.com/splash?splash=1

Beverly Hills World Spirit Competition
www.bhspiritscomp.com
2015 deadline TBD

International Craft Spirits Awards
2015 deadline TBD
craftcompetition.com

EVENTS

Fancy Food Show
Winter show: San Francisco, Jan 11-13, 2015, San Francisco
Summer show Washington DC, June 2015
http://www.specialtyfood.com/do/fancyFoodShow/LocationsAndDates

Boston Wine Expo
Feb. 14-15, 2015, Boston, MA
http://www.wine-expos.com/

South Beach Wine and Food Festival
Feb. 20-23, 2015, Miami, FL
http://www.sobefest.com/

ProWein
March 15-17, 2015, Dusseldorf, Germany
http://www.prowein.com/

Vinitaly
March 22-25, 2015, Verona Italy
http://www.vinitaly.com/

Distiller’s Convention & Trade Show
Put on by American Craft Distillers Assn.
March 30-April 2, 2015, Louisville, KY
http://distilling.com/2015-spirits-conference/

Nightclub & Bar Show
Las Vegas, March 31-Apr 1, 2015
www.ncbshow.com

Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America (WSWA)
April 12-14, 2015, Orlando, FL
www.wswa.org

Craft Beverage Expo
May 6-8, 2015
Santa Clara, CA
http://craftbeverageexpo.com/

NRA (National Restaurant Association)
May 15-19, 2015, Chicago
http://www.restaurant.org/show/

Manhattan Cocktail Classic
Mid-May 2015 in New York.
http://manhattancocktailclassic.com/

London International Wine Fair
May 20-22, 2015, London UK
http://www.londonwinefair.com/content

Vinexpo
June 14-18, 2015, Bordeaux, France
www.vinexpo.com

Aspen Food and Wine Classic
June 19-21, 2015 Aspen, CO
http://www.foodandwine.com/classic-in-aspen

North American Wine Bloggers Conference
July 13-16, 2015, Corning (Finger Lakes) NY
http://winebloggersconference.org/america/agenda/

Tales of the Cocktail
July 15-19, 2015 New Orleans
http://www.talesofthecocktail.com/

San Diego Spirits Festival
Aug.22-23, 2015, San Diego, CA
http://www.sandiegospiritsfestival.com/

Australia Trade Tasting
Aug. 31-Sept2, 2015, Melbourne, Australia
australiatradetasting.com

Wine Riot US Tour 2015
Consumer event targeting Millennials
Multiple cities/dates
http://secondglass.com/wineriot/

Around the World in 80 Sips
Multiple cities/dates
http://www.bottlenotes.com/around-the-world-in-80-sips-20

http://craftcompetition.com/

New York Wine Experience
2015 TBD
New York
http://nywe2014.winespectator.com/index.html

Digital Wine Communications Conference (formerly European Wine Bloggers Conference)
2015 dates and location TBD, usually late fall.
http://ewbc.vrazon.com/

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For Immediate Release: “I Don’t Get No Respect”

Amber Gallaty who heads up our New York office forwarded a great post from “A Journalist” lambasting PR folks for robo-pitching.  http://qz.com/296528/dear-pr-person-who-just-sent-me-a-robo-pitch/

It prompted me to summarize what I’ve learned from  40 years in PR and the surfeit of crappy pitches I now get because this blog has made it onto someone’s list:

-READ what they write, pitch to their interest and make the pitch personal.
-Don’t pretend you know the person if you don’t.
-Invest the time, energy and money to get to know them in person so you establish credibility with no quid pro quo implied or stated.
-Be formal….no “hey there”, or “Hi!” (“My name’s BRITney!!!!!!!)
-Don’t use exclamation points. As Tish once told me, God gave you three: One for your birth announcement, one for your obit, and one to use during your life. Use it wisely.
-Cut to the chase…open with an insight that speaks to their interest or something they just wrote, then pitch your idea’s value relative to that. “I just read the piece you did about e-commerce and was intrigued by your ideas. Here’s a different perspective on the subject you might find interesting.”
-Follow up with a reason why their particular readers would find the story of interest.
-Don’t ask them to do anything (“let me know if you want some more information, photos etc.”) That’s your job.
-Don’t follow up with an email asking, “just checking to see if you got my pitch email.” If you must follow up,  I’d rather get a phone call than an email…these days it’s more personal.
-Find a creative way to get the answer to the question you’re really asking: “are you going to write anything about the subject I sent you.”

Lastly, recognize that real journalism is a dying craft. Those still employed are getting paid a pittance, and they’re clinging to a belief that what they do matters to the paying subscribers of their  rapidly expiring publications. PR folks need to acknowledge and respect that.

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New Research on Importance of E-Commerce as Behavior Target

I just came across an interesting study by some folks at Cal Poly on the profile of  e-commerce wine purchasers.buy-wine
My key takeaway is that online buyers are the center of the target for us for premium (>$12/bottle) wine brands.   It’s an indicator that’s much more precise than demographics or psychographics of their receptivity and likelihood to buy better wines.

They:
-buy more wine
-buy more expensive wine
-consider themselves knowledgeable about wine and talk about wine with friends. They are regarded as the experts in their social circle and are more influential than all the wine magazines and websites …probably combined!

Not surprisingly they’re more likely to use phone apps, websites and search in Google…and less likely to use print as wine information source.

Here are some of the details and conclusions

Online wine buyers are more likely to:
-Consider themselves a wine enthusiast
-enjoy talking about wine
-Consider themselves knowledgeable about wine
-Consider themselves a wine connoisseur

Online wine buyers vs. non online buyers
-buy on average two more bottles of wine/month
-spend more on wine/month:$135 vs. $81.61
spend more than 18.50 on a bottle
-interested in wines that are: premium quality, from a recognized growing region, from a family owned and/or boutique winery. (Also less interested in wine at a sale price)

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States Where Supermarket Sales of Wine AND In-Store Tastings Are Allowed

States allowing supermarket sales and on premise tastings

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Article in Drinks International on entering the US market

Drinks International just ran a piece I wrote on Understanding and Appreciating the US Market…a synopsis of our reccos on how to approach this challenge.

Understanding and appreciating the US market
01 October, 2014
By Steve Raye

Guestwriter Steve Raye of Brand Action Team tells us his practical advice for exporters looking for a US importer.Steve Raye

The US may be the biggest and most attractive market in the world for export brands, but securing an importer to represent your wine, spirit or beer brand can be a daunting task. One great resource is Deborah Grey’s How to Import Wine. An Insider’s Guide. For those of you with limited time, here’s a précis of the key elements that will make success more likely.

The first is to learn and understand the intricacies of the American market and know the fundamental difference between importer and distributor to the shibboleths such as “franchise states.”

Identifying candidates is second. You can create your target list by using tools such as LinkedIn, asking your personal network for referrals and recommendations, and subscribing to industry newsletters and monitoring news of changes and relationships. Beverage Trade Network is a good tool and for larger enterprises able to afford bespoke, our ImporterConnect service may be appropriate.

You have to be specific in identifying what criteria are critical to you: size and scope including turnover, personnel resources, and national vs regional or state coverage etc. Also take into account whether the importer has a distribution arm. Some importers do, and many distributors function as importers via DI orders.

Then there is traditional versus non-traditional. By traditional we mean companies whose primary function is importing and marketing agency brands. This spans the range from transnationals such as Diageo and Pernod Ricard, to specialist importers like Palm Bay and Wm. Deutsch that specialise in certain categories and countries.

Think beyond those to alternative solutions that may be a better fit for your brand. Nationally licensed service import companies such as MHW, retail buying groups like the Wine and Spirits Guild, large state or national chains such as BevMo! and Total Wine. Consider whether setting up your own operation with a family member resident in the US makes sense, or going totally non-traditional with an e-commerce model.

All have differing strengths and weaknesses but you need to do the due diligence in exploring them to find the right strategy for you.

What’s in it for me? It’s not about you it’s about the importer. Make sure you fully understand what they are looking for. They are primarily interested in growing their business. If you can present your company as a solution to their problem, you’re much more likely to be successful. Remember, most of the people you’ll be talking to are very busy running their existing business. Generally speaking, they are not actively hunting for new brands. They may be receptive to what you have to offer but only insofar as they feel they have the expertise to develop and grow, and the brands represent unique positioning that can further their business goals.

That’s the practical side, but also consider the emotional side. You need to make sure you are “sympatico” in terms of personal chemistry, complementary business goals and operating style.

Key questions you need to investigate about them: What is their market reach, portfolio strategy, market niche? What resources do they have in terms of sales and marketing personnel, transparency in reporting, receptiveness in collaborating with you in marketing? Does their portfolio and focus fit with your US strategy?

Key questions they’ll have about you are, do your brands represent a gap in their portfolio they are looking to fill? Do you have existing U.S. volume they can take over and grow? Do your company and brands enhance their image, awareness or profitability? Are you financially sound and have a budget to invest and support the brand?

And don’t forget, finding an importer you want to talk to is step one. You’ll need a strategy to get their attention and then get a meeting. A common refrain we hear is: “I get 100 calls a week; I take less than 10, and might ultimately have a meeting with one.”

Once you have the meeting scheduled, make sure you are fully buttoned up and focused. Do your homework, take the time to investigate and learn about them so you can present your opportunity in its best light relative to their business strategy. Also, have a defined (meaning written) strategy for how and what you want to accomplish in the US.

If you do make it through the constraint of the narrow part of the hourglass, recognise the real work is just starting. You’ll need to consult an attorney with experience in wine/spirit/beer import contracts, a strategy for managing existing inventory, a plan for representation, management and oversight of the relationship, and finally, ongoing support such as winemaker visits and shared marketing support programming.

 

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